0.39.0

Adding a new language for document processing🔗

Then there are other commits and issues to look at:

Some older commits may be a bit out of date, but still show the relevant things to do. These are:

  • add it to Language.scala, create a new case object and add it to the all list (then fix compile errors)
  • define a list of month names to support date recognition and update DateFind.scala to recognize date patterns for that language. Add some tests to DateFindTest.
  • add it to joex' dockerfile to be available for tesseract
  • update the solr migration/field definitions in SolrSetup. Create a new solr migration that adds the content field for the new language - it is a copy&paste from other similar changes.
  • update FtsRepository for the PostgreSQL fulltext search variant: if not sure, use simple here
  • update the elm file so it shows up on the client. Also requires to add translations in Messages.Data.Language

Test🔗

Check if everything is fine with sbt Test/compile. After the project compiles without errors, run sbt fix to apply formatting fixes.

It would be good to startup docspell and check the new lanugage a bit, including whether fulltext search is working.

Sometimes, SOLR doesn't support a language. In this case the migration needs to first add the new field type. There are examples for Lithuanian and Hebrew in the code.

For the docker image, you can run

PLATFORMS=linux/amd64 ./build.sh 0.36.0-SNAPSHOT

in docker/dockerfile directory to build the docker image (just choose some version, it doesn't matter).

Non-NLP only🔗

Note that this is without support for NLP. Including support for NLP means that the stanford nlp library needs to provide models for it and these must be included in the build and tested a bit.

Opening issues on Github🔗

You can also open an issue on github requesting to support a language. I kindly ask to include all necessary information, like in this issue. I know that I can dig it out from websites, but it would be nice to have everything ready. Also it is better to know from a local person some details, like which date patterns are more likely to appear than others.